How to Make a Chainless Foundation Single Crochet Main Image

Chainless Foundation Single Crochet: How to + Video Tutorial

Nothing has revolutionized my crochet life more than mastering this super simple technique – the chainless foundation. I am not one that enjoys crocheting into a chain. To me, it is tedious work. So when I learned how to make a crochet chain AND the first row of single (or double, or half double!) crochet AT THE SAME TIME, my mind was blown. Learn how to save time and tears in this video tutorial about how to make a chainless foundation single crochet.

WHY THE CHAINLESS FOUNDATION SINGLE CROCHET STITCH IS SO AMAZING:

Have you ever panicked when you read the beginning of a pattern that included chaining any more than 20, followed by crocheting all the way back down that chain? I know.

My heart rate is increasing even now as I think about it.

it. is. just. so. FIDDLY. Not to mention how long it takes!

Well fear no more, my friend. Your solution has arrived. The chainless foundation stitch makes the chain AND the first row of SINGLE crochet AT THE SAME TIME.

I’m going to give you a moment to just sit with that and take in the beauty of it.

No matter how fast you crochet, the fiddlyness of crocheting back into a chain adds so much time. Even though you’re adding an extra yarn-over when you’re making a chainless foundation, it’s just so much easier to get into flow just as if you were working on your 3rd or 4th row of a repeat.

Deep breath out. Ahhh. That is why I describe this stitch as revolutionary to my crochet life. I was so relieved. Like “where, oh where, chainless foundation, have you been all my life?” And this magical technique can be used with NOT ONLY single crochet, but half double, double and treble stitches as well.

So alas, let me begin by introducing you to some of the important characteristics of the chainless foundation single crochet stitch.

ABBREVIATION:

In a pattern, the chainless foundation single crochet stitch is abbreviated FSC.

HEIGHT:

The chainless foundation single crochet stitch is slightly taller than the traditional technique of chaining and then crocheting back into that chain. But only slightly taller.

VERSATILITY:

The characteristic that I love the most about this stitch is it’s beautiful stretch and flexibility. Often times a foundation row of single crochet that has been made by crocheting into a chain is tight and shorter than the rest of the project. When this happens with, a sweater, for example, the resulting comfort level and flex is NO BUENO.

Another annoying thing about crocheting into a chain is often times it can leave unsightly gaps between the stitches. Albeit, crocheting into the back bump of a chain almost completely eliminates this, there is still a look and feel to the chainless foundation that starts the flow of the project off perfectly.

WRITTEN STEPS:

  1. Slip knot knot your hook
  2. Chain 2
  3. Insert your hook into the second chain from the hook
  4. Yarn over and pull up a loop (you now have 2 loops on your hook)
  5. Yarn over again and pull through ONE loop on your hook
  6. Yarn over and pull through the TWO loops on your hook
  7. Insert your hook into the bottom of that stitch (under both strands) and repeat steps 4-6

VIDEO TUTORIAL – CHAINLESS FOUNDATION SINGLE CROCHET:

I hope you feel as relieved as I did the day I learned about the chainless foundation. Leave a comment and let me know what other techniques have revolutionized your crochet life!

Want more quick and easy tutorials? Check out more in my FREE Resource Library.

How to make a single crochet Image Main

How to Make a Single Crochet + Video Tutorial

Mastering the single crochet stitch is the best place to start when learning how to crochet. The techniques and finger + wrist movements that you learn when working through the single crochet will become the familiar foundation of all the crochet stitches and techniques you will learn afterwards. In this written + video tutorial you will learn how to make a single crochet stitch.

This tutorial is given using US terms. If your pattern is written in anything other than that, I’ve made a printable term conversion chart that you can reference so this all makes sense!

I’ll give you the written steps for how to make a single crochet stitch below, but it might be quicker to just watch my quick video tutorial which I’ve included below as well!

How to make a single crochet Pinterest Pin

Let me begin by introducing you to some of the important characteristics of the single crochet stitch.

ABBREVIATION & CHART SYMBOL:

In a pattern, the single crochet stitch is abbreviated SC (uppercase or lowercase). On a crochet chart, the symbol for single crochet is a “+” or an “X”.

HEIGHT & WEIGHT:

The single crochet stitch is short. It isn’t as short as a slip stitch, but it’s the next shortest basic stitch. Your project will not grow in height as quickly as using the taller half double crochet, double crochet or treble crochet. Because it is a nice stout stitch, the fabric it creates is tight and dense with very little drape and no gaps between stitches or rows. This is why it is the most common stitch used in amigurumi.

VERSATILITY:

Although it is one of the most basic stitches in the art of crochet, it is also super versatile. It can be used when crocheting rows, rounds and crocheted in any number of the 3 loops or the post of a stitch to create ribbing and other textures to your project.

How to make a single crochet image 1

WRITTEN STEPS:

  1. Make a crochet chain in any number of stitches (or the number your pattern calls for)
  2. Insert your hook into the second chain from the hook
  3. Yarn over and pull up a loop (you now have 2 loops on your hook)
  4. Yarn over again and pull through both loops on your hook
  5. Repeat steps 2-4, by inserting your hook through the next chain or stitch on your project

VIDEO TUTORIAL:

You’re now off and on your way! Keep practicing these steps over and over and soon the single crochet will become second nature to you.

Want more quick and easy tutorials? Check out more in my FREE Resource Library.

How to Make a Crochet Chain Stitch – Video Tutorial

Knowing how to crochet a chain stitch is an essential crochet technique and super easy to do. A large number of your crochet projects will begin with a crochet chain. The chain stitch is commonly used within a project as well. This post will teach you how to make a crochet chain stitch! You can also find the video tutorial for this (below) and lots of other crochet video tutorials in my free Resource Library.

In a pattern, a chain is abbreviated as “ch”. Not to be confused with the chemical formula abbreviation CH – which stands for the methylidyne radical for all the chemistry geeks out there. Shout out!

I’m also a HUGE fan of the chainless foundation – especially when you’re project requires a super long chain with an immediate turn and requirement to crochet back into that chain. I despise that. I’m not ashamed to say it….

I just DO NOT like crocheting into a chain. End rant.

The chainless foundation allows you to make your chain AND your first row of crochet at the same time. REVOLUTIONARY. My video tutorial on how to do that can be found here. I would also be remiss to mention that I have a video tutorial on how to crochet into the back bump of a chain (versus the front top loop) which creates a MUCH nicer, neater, tighter first row. Crocheting into the back bump creates a first row that meshes well with the rest of your project and avoids all the terrible gaps that can be created in your first row when crocheting into the top loop of the chain. So if you aren’t super stoked about learning the chainless foundation, I would at least encourage you to become comfortable with crocheting into the back bump. Or, at least, give it a try and decide for yourself!

On how to crochet a chain stitch, I’ll give you written steps below, but it might be quicker to just watch my two minute tutorial which I’ve included below as well!

Chain photo 1

Description/Purpose:

To make a foundation of crochet chain stitches to begin your project or create chain stitches within your project.

Chain photo 2

Steps:

  1. Slip Knot onto your hook.
  2. Yarn over hook and pull loop through.
  3. Repeat step 2 for however many chains you need or that your pattern calls for.

Want more quick and easy tutorials? I’ve got a ton of them in the FREE Resource Library which you can find here.

Slip Knot Featured Image

How to Slip Knot Onto Your Crochet Hook – Video Tutorial

It all starts here – the slip knot. Knowing how to slip knot onto your crochet hook will become something you can do in your sleep. It is THE THING that secures your yarn to your crochet hook. No slip knot, no making. In the steps below and the one minute video tutorial that follows, you will learn how to do it!

There are about as many ways to slip knot onto your hook as there are ways to HOLD your hook. They ALL end up in the same slip knot – it’s just the steps that are taken to get you there. So, don’t get thrown off when you see crocheters doing it differently. As long as you end up with a legit slip knot on your hook, you’ll be good to go. A slip knot is a type of knot that behaves just as it sounds – a knot that slips. It easily slips to make the loop larger or smaller, opening and closing. It’s not a SET knot that doesn’t move or change or shift once it’s secure.

So let’s get to making!

I’ll give you written steps describing how to slip knot onto your crochet hook, but it might be quicker to just watch my ONE MINUTE tutorial which I’ve included below!

Description/Purpose:

To secure your yarn onto your crochet hook.

Slip Knot 2 Post Image

Steps:

  1. Take your starting yarn and create loop just as if you were making a regular ol’ knot. Rather than pulling the short/loose end of the yarn fully through the loop, leave it dangling through the loop as you tighten the knot.
  2. Insert your crochet hook, front to back, through the loop created. Pull on the short/dangly end of the yarn to secure the knot right up onto your hook.

Want more quick and easy tutorials? I’ve got a ton of them in the FREE Resource Library which you can find here.

How to Back Bump Single Crochet Featured Image

How to Single Crochet into the Back Bump of a Chain

When I committed to mastering the skill of how to single crochet into the back bump of a chain, it revolutionized the finished product of my crochet projects. REVOLUTIONIZED.

I promise.

Momma always told me not to say “hate”, so I’ll say I REALLY DISLIKE crocheting into a chain. Which is also why I mastered the foundation stitch chaining method. There are several reason why I really dislike crocheting into a chain, but the main reason USED TO BE because of the ugly, horrible, annoying GAPS IN EVERY STITCH along the first row of my project. Crocheting into the back bump of a chain completely eliminates those gaps and allows your first row to blend seamlessly into the rest without standing out and completely interrupting the cohesiveness of your project.

Enough said about the horrors of the first-row-gap.

Also, a heads up – in a pattern, the back bump can also be referred to the “third loop”, “back loop”, “back bar” or “bottom loop”.

So in an attempt to bring you over to my side on this topic, I’ve created a video tutorial on just how easy it is to switch to this method of crocheting into your chain. I’ll give you written steps below, but it might be more helpful to just watch my video tutorial which I’ve included below too!

Back Bump 2 Video Tutorial Image

Description:

Work your crochet stitch into the back bump of the chain, verses the front, top loop. This technique forces the top two loops down to the bottom of the row.

Back Bump 1 Video Tutorial Image

Purpose

Allows the first row of your project to blend beautifully in with the rest of your rows and avoids gaps under every stitch of your first row. Because this technique forces the top two loops to the bottom of your first row, it creates a symmetrical look since it more closely mirrors the “V” shape created when making a crochet stitch.

Another benefit is if you chain with uneven tension, somehow this technique magically eliminates any issues with bringing all those back in line with each other.

Back Bump 4 Video Tutorial Image

Steps:

  1. Identify the back bump: each chain of your chain is made up of three loops. Identify the front two loops which together create a “V” shape. Turn them over to identify the back bump (aka “third loop”).
  2. Make your first stitch into the appropriate back bump as specified by your pattern and which stitch you are using. This is typically the
    • second bump from the hook if using single crochet,
    • third bump from the hook if using half double crochet
    • fourth bump from the hook if using double crochet
    • fifth bump from the hook if using treble crochet
  3. Continue on down the chain, making a stitch into each of the back bumps of your chain until you reach the end!

Want more quick and easy tutorials? I’ve got a ton of them in the FREE Resource Library which you can find here.

How to Make an Increase Stitch Resource Library Image

How to Crochet an Increase Stitch

Knowing how to crochet an increase stitch into your crochet project is an essential crochet technique and super easy to do. The purpose of an increase in crochet is to grow your project. The growing occurs in either width or circumference. Increasing in conjunction with decreasing is also used to make curves and turns.

In a pattern, an increase can also be called for by stating, “crochet 2 stitches into the next stitch” or “crochet 3 stitches into the next stitch”. You may ALSO see it as “doubling” or “tripling” a stitch.

Not to make it confusing or anything. GEEZ.

I’ll give you written steps below, but it might be quicker to just watch my ONE MINUTE tutorial which I’ve included below too!

How to increase stitch video tutorial image

Description:

Work two or more stitches into one stitch. This applies to whatever type of stitch you’re using – single crochet, double crochet, etc.

Purpose:

To grow your crochet project in width or circumference by adding stitches.

How to make an increase stitch image 2

Steps:

  1. Make your first single crochet into the next stitch as normal.
  2. Crochet one more single crochet into that same stitch which you just used for the first stitch

Want more quick and easy tutorials? I’ve got a ton of them in the FREE Resource Library which you can find here.